Tag: Digital Healthcare

future of healthcare

How Mobility will Transform the Future of Healthcare System in the US

The way in which the US population seek and receive care is so dynamic that it often becomes hard to keep track and also predict the future of healthcare system in America.  Healthcare providers are taking on financial risk for patients, identifying ways to improve healthcare access and outcomes, and prioritizing consumer experience in order to cope with the changing patient needs. Despite several challenges coming their way, providers are increasingly looking at ways to adopt mobility into healthcare solutions.

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What is healthcare mobility?

The rapid adoption of mobile devices and other advanced technology by healthcare providers to improve patient care is known as healthcare mobility. As a greater number of patients are increasingly looking for convenient ways to gain healthcare access, mobile devices are gradually becoming a significant part of healthcare IT infrastructure. The use of mobile devices in healthcare will not only reduce the time it takes to save a patient’s life by retrieving data and communicating with team members faster, but it will also give clinicians the tools they require at their fingertips whether they are operating in a primary care, ICU, or emergency unit. Some of the key benefits that mobility can provide in the future of healthcare include:

  • Demand for trauma care will fall as partially and fully autonomous vehicles become mainstream.
  • Increased access to healthcare as providers can develop better mobility networks. As a result, patients will get new options to reach existing providers.
  • More efficient supply networks with fundamental changes in the medical supply chain, thereby enabling nimble transportation networks and disrupting existing models.

This blog from Infiniti Research explores how the various changes that will unfold in the future of healthcare will benefit providers and highlights how providers and other stakeholders in the healthcare industry can position themselves in an ecosystem that is underpinned by autonomous and shared mobility.

The role of mobility in enhancing the future of healthcare

Future of healthcareReduced demand for trauma care

According to reports, in 2012 alone, the number of patients in the US visiting the emergency room due to motor vehicle accidents were over 2 million. This has resulted in millions of dollars’ worth of lifetime medical costs. As roadways in the US are being increasingly filled with autonomous vehicles, accident rates and the associated financial, social, and health burdens are expected to fall. With fewer road accidents, demand for trauma care will likely decline. In the United States, this will likely amplify the future of healthcare to shift focus on advancing overall population health and preventative care.

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Improved access to care

One of the persistent challenges for health systems is patient-no show. With the rising number of missed appointment rates in many large clinics, there is a consequent financial burden and lost efficiency for providers. Access to transportation is often a critical barrier to receiving care, especially for chronic conditions that require regular appointments. With mobility, healthcare systems or emergent players could create mobile care units that optimize health professional rounds, dispatching physicians, and nurses to remote care sites or patient homes. Furthermore, the concept of driverless vehicle enables the usage of other emergent technologies such as additive manufacturing, augmented reality, and virtual reality to create highly capable autonomous mobile care units that can carry out tasks that once took place in hospitals, such as 3D printing a custom cast for a broken bone on the spot, running tests on vitals, or holding consultations with specialists.

Optimize clinical supply chain and procurement

Mobility transformation will play a significant role in making the future of healthcare better for not only the patients but also the providers. Medical supply chains can be dangerously fragile. With increased access to cheaper, faster, and more flexible distribution channels, healthcare systems would be able to deliver clinical supplies more efficiently and at a lower cost across their provider network. Distribution networks powered by advanced technology could promise a better future of healthcare with increased speed and predictability with which goods move from suppliers to patients or providers. Companies throughout the medical supply chain should think about how mobility in the future of healthcare could impact their business models, including the potential unintended consequences.

Get more info on the opportunities and challenges facing the future of healthcare

healthcare consumerism

Healthcare Consumerism: The New Imperative for Providers

With the advent of healthcare consumerism – a movement to make the delivery of healthcare services more efficient and cost-effective, the U.S. is about to embark upon a new era where consumers are more knowledgeable of the medical services and play an active role in purchasing and consuming the services that they receive.

What is healthcare consumerism?

The concept of consumerism in healthcare is recent, with references to patients as “consumers” dating back to the early 20th century. Healthcare consumerism transforms an employer’s health benefit plan by giving plan participants the primary decision-making power. The ultimate goal of healthcare consumerism is to enable patients to actively be a part of their healthcare decisions.

However, many plans fail to understand or ask consumers about how they consume healthcare services. As a result, patients tend to pay little attention to cost since they only have a limited role in the healthcare decision. Furthermore, usually patients prefer to stay away from managing their own health information; instead, they are eager to be cared for by an efficient healthcare system that respects their preferences. In order to develop more meticulous healthcare users, healthcare providers must provide information, financial incentives, and decision-making tools to allow consumers to make educated healthcare purchasing decisions.

Winning empowered consumers is critical at a time when patients are demanding more in response to rising costs. Not sure how to achieve this? Request a free proposal to know how our tailor-made solutions can help you.

Objectives of healthcare consumerism

According to healthcare industry experts at Infiniti Research, healthcare consumerism is designed to:

  • Promote closer communications and cooperation between healthcare professionals and patients
  • Encourage patient buy-in and compliance with treatment recommendations
  • Increase knowledge and awareness of lifestyle and wellness practices among patients
  • Focus increasingly on preventative medicine by encouraging healthy activities and habits

Healthcare consumerism: boon or bane?

The era of consumerism in healthcare has arrived. Direct-to-consumer advertising of pharmaceuticals, health newsletters from leading hospitals and medical schools, and, most importantly, the near-ubiquity of the Internet have made it easy for consumers to obtain information about their medical conditions and possible treatments. This presents healthcare providers and patients with both challenges and opportunities.

Some studies suggest that healthcare consumerism can negatively affect the quality of patient-doctor communications. A clash of opinion could arise when the patient’s preconceptions do not match with the doctor’s assessment. Perhaps less information gets effectively exchanged. Even when more information is in fact exchanged, the patient may discount what he or she hears from the doctor. Furthermore, consumerism may raise the possibility of disagreement between patients and clinicians, increase mutual frustration, and result in inefficient use of patient-clinician visit time.

But this is only a part of the story. studies have demonstrated that healthcare consumerism is important to patients, although results vary based on patient demographics and on the complexity of the healthcare decision. Most patients have a much greater personal investment in their own well-being and treatments than the providers in the healthcare industry do and are willing to devote more time to understanding and determining diagnosis and treatment.

The U.S. healthcare industry is en route major transformations and providers must identify ways to revamp their offerings and fill their services gaps in order to survive the dynamic changes. Wondering where to begin? Request a free brochure to know more about our solutions for the healthcare industry.

What's in it for you?

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Download this free resource from Infiniti Research to gain comprehensive insights on:

  • The opportunities of healthcare consumerism for providers
  • The key challenges of healthcare consumerism
  • Why addressing healthcare consumerism should be the top priority for healthcare professionals in 2019
  • The future of healthcare consumerism

Learn more about our solutions for the healthcare industry

Healthcare delivery models

How the Evolving Healthcare Delivery Models are Changing the Care Delivery System

Delivering high-quality, accessible, and affordable care are some of the key challenges faced by healthcare systems globally. Healthcare delivery systems must be equipped to address these challenges via the evolving healthcare delivery models. This blog explores some of the new healthcare delivery models and how they are designed to meet the unique needs of complex patients, ensure consistent adoption of best clinical practices, gives greater emphasis on delivering care in the most efficient way, and the changing focus to outcomes rather than inputs.

The global healthcare industry is undergoing a period of transformation. Stay on par with the top players in the market by choosing innovative healthcare delivery models. Request a free proposal to know how our experts can help you achieve this.

New healthcare delivery models

healthcare delivery modelsOut-of-hospital delivery models

Proactive and intensive care for complex conditions

There has been a rapid rise in the number of people diagnosed with long term and complex conditions in the last decade. These conditions are driven by increasingly unhealthy lifestyles and ageing populations. Healthcare delivery systems must identify more proactive ways to manage these patients in the community as well as in their homes. For instance, there are healthcare delivery models in the US that provides holistic care for older patients with multiple long-term conditions through a one-stop-shop. Here, the patients have access to a range of specialists and expanded primary care. Such establishments have not only improved patient outcomes for older and poorer patients, but also reduced hospitalization rates, readmissions, and provided better care and outcomes.

Access to urgent medical care

One of the key challenges faced by every health care system is to avoid unnecessary admissions into their emergency departments. Our healthcare industry analysis in the UK and several other European countries suggest that easy access to high-quality primary care has a real impact on patients. For example, there was a reduction in emergency attendance in Central London with the introduction of general practitioner services seven days a week.

Local access to care for children

Several providers are adopting healthcare delivery models that involve redesigning local services for children to provide high-quality care supported by a network of specialists made available when children and their families most need it. A typical pediatric services model includes one inpatient unit per one million people. It is supported by a network of pediatric assessments units with a 14/7 access to high-quality primary children’s care services. These services include same-day telephone consultations for children with a primary care professional, a telephone hotline for these professionals to seek advice from a consultant pediatrician, and also outreach clinics to treat children with complex health needs and thereby avoid hospital referrals.

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Hospital healthcare delivery models

Specialist centers of excellence

Healthcare delivery models in the form of specialist centers for stroke, cardiac arrest, cancer, and major trauma services are seen to phenomenally successful in the UK. The scale is also achieved through a chain or franchising across multiple sites. These specialist centers have shown immense progress in terms of ensuring adequate care and high-quality treatment to patients.

Community-based hospitals

The success of healthcare delivery models in the form of smaller hospitals requires creative thinking on the workforce along with a recognition that not every hospital has a full range of acute services. These establishments cater to the specific healthcare services such as emergency services or surgery, ensure shorter wait time and faster availability of treatment for patients.

Common characteristics of successful healthcare delivery models

Healthcare delivery models

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Answers to the questions

The US Medical Device Industry: How to devise a Market Entry Strategy

With an enormous market size of $156 billion, the medical device industry in the United States remains the largest in the world. Companies in the medical device industry consist of articles, instruments, apparatuses, or machines that are used in the prevention, diagnosis or treatment of illness or disease, or for detecting, measuring, restoring, correcting, or modifying the structure or function of the body for some health-related purpose. Although patients are the end-users of medical devices, manufacturers ideally focus their efforts towards selling their products to healthcare providers who in turn use them to serve the needs of patients.

Majority of the companies in the US medical device industry are concentrated in regions known for other high-technology industries, such as microelectronics and biotechnology. The states with the highest number of companies in the medical device industry include New York, California, Florida, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Illinois, and Georgia. Compared to several other industries including telecommunications, automotive, and defense, the medical device industry invests a higher percentage of their yearly revenues into product innovation, reflecting the competitive nature of the industry and constant innovation and improvement requirements of existing technologies.

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